10 Reveals Like Vikings To Watch Whereas Ready For Season 6 Half 2

History Channel’s Vikings season 6 isn’t coming back for a while and we still don’t know when part 2 of final season will premiere. The series is still gearing up for the series finale later this year (the show is currently on hiatus in the middle of its sixth and final season, but a Netflix spin-off is coming soon) so it’s time to get over Kattegat After finishing Vikings, looking out for the show should be careful.

We’ve searched all of TV for shows that all Viking fans will love. Not all are about Vikings; Some follow different groups of warriors throughout history, while others depict more of the medieval sword and shield battles that Vikings became famous for. If you’re here for more history, or just here to see someone’s head cut off, these Viking-like shows are what you need.

Looking for more recommendations on what to see next? We have a lot of them! We also have recommendations for the best historical dramas on Netflix and the best supernatural shows to watch right now.

Barbarians

Where to see: Netflix

Barbarians

Someone on Netflix said, “Let’s make our own Vikings, but not quite as well.” And then barbarians were born. The German series released its first six-episode season in October 2020 and follows the title strains of German warriors who fought the Roman Empire in AD 9 in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest. Like the Vikings, she has a lot of complicated inter-tribal politics. strange haircuts and fierce battles. But for real Viking fans, it might feel like a discount.

Raised by wolves

Where to see: HBO max

Travis Fimmel, raised by wolves

You’ve become such a huge fan of Travis Fimmel since the beginning of the Vikings (Ragnar!) That you saw Warcraft only to see him again. That was obviously a mistake, but don’t let Fimmel’s newest venture, his first TV series role since Vikings, sneak past you without a watch. In the HBO Max science fiction series, Fimmel is portrayed as a space crusader trying to get his son back from two androids who took the child to raise on an abandoned planet. It’s full of questions about parents and religion, and it’s tough, weird science fiction that has been pared down to the bare essentials with the help of Ridley Scott, who produced the series and directed the first two episodes. In addition, Fimmel makes some impressions of a duck showing his stupid side.

game of Thrones

Where to see: HBO, HBO max

Emilia Clarke, Game of Thrones

Here’s the most obvious choice: HBO’s Game of Thrones. Since Game of Thrones preceded the Vikings a few years, it’s entirely possible that you found Vikings because of your love for Game of Thrones. But if for some reason you haven’t seen Game of Thrones, a) where have you been? and b) You will find the only show in the last decade that has better battle scenes than the Vikings. And contrary to what you may have been told, Game of Thrones doesn’t emphasize elements of fantasy. Yes, there are dragons, but when writer George RR Martin invented the story, he based it on the story, particularly the War of the Roses, in which several different families claimed the crown. It’s your call to see if you’d like to see the last two seasons, which unfortunately didn’t do the rest of the show justice.

The last kingdom

Where to see: Netflix

The last kingdom

Of all the shows on this list, The Last Kingdom will be the most similar to the Vikings and should be your first stop if you’re trying to relive the thrill of Ragnar and his company. Based on Bernard Cornwell’s Saxon stories, The Last Kingdom almost overlaps with the events of the Vikings (beginning in 793), beginning with the Viking conquest of York in 866. The show’s hero is Uhtred from Bebbanburg, a Saxon who is from Adopted and raised as one of the invading Vikings after the Vikings conquered his homeland. He pulls him in two different directions as he has the blood of a Saxon but as a Danish Viking. Because the two shows are loosely based on the same story, some characters in both shows appear at different ages in similar stories separated by a generation of story.

Northmen

Where to see: Netflix

Northmen

A little tired of the seriousness of the Vikings, what about all the war, the dismemberment, and family members stabbing each other in the back? The harsh world of Old Norse life slips onto a banana peel in this English-language Norwegian comedy that uses a sense of humor to forge Viking culture somewhere between Monty Python and the Farrelly Brothers. Although everyone wears animal skins and ragged armor, some of the dialogue is downright modern, for example when the show version of The Seer says “Hate the player, not the game” when trying to get the reluctant handmaid of the village into a cocktail to spit drink to fulfill a prophecy. It’s completely silly, but that’s the whole point.

Knightfall

Where to see: Netflix

Simon Merrells, Knightfall

After the Vikings’ deserved success, History Channel looked for more historical dramas in the same vein, showing history being used as a blueprint, and then making an intricate drama around it. Knightfall 2017 most closely resembles the strategy of the Vikings. This time it goes to the 14th century to visit the Knights Templar. The series follows Landry de Lauzon, a disappointed Knight Templar whose faith is rekindled when he learns that the Holy Grail – yes, THAT Holy Grail – has resurfaced in France.

Real vikings

Where to see: Amazon Prime

Real vikings

Vikings are such a hit with history that in 2016 the network released these accompanying documentaries for fans thirsting for more knowledge about Viking culture. With a behind-the-scenes look, interviews with historians and conversations with the stars of the show, Real Vikings delves deep into the history of the Vikings, from their routes of looting to their spiritual ceremonies to their seafaring technology. There are only four episodes, but it’s a must-have for fans looking to discover more Viking culture.

Black sails

Where to see: Hulu, Starz

Black sails

If “Yarrrrrr” is faster than “Skoll!” Then set sail for the underrated pirate drama Black Sails. Like the Vikings, it describes a culture most of us know more from Halloween costumes than actual history, with different factions competing against each other as they all want the same thing. In the case of the Vikings, it is land; in the case of the Black Sails, it is treasure. Black Sails is actually a difficult sequel to Treasure Island, with characters like Long John Silver, Captain Flint and Billy Bones from Robert Louis Stevenson’s books brought to life in a suspenseful drama. There aren’t as many battles as Vikings that focus more on the renegade cutthroat strategy of these seafarers, but when ships collide in the crystal blue open water it’s one of the best action ever seen on television.

Spartacus

Where to see: Starz

Spartacus blood and sand

You know what? It’s okay to like Vikings for their bloodshed. And when it splatters purple, it’s a tidal wave that you get in the Starz Spartacus series. Spartacus, one of the most brutal and violent series of all time, is set in 72 BC. In the Roman Empire and follows the gladiators who made murder a sport that Spartacus likes to display in an artistic cinematic way. And in keeping with the hedonism of the time, the show is also full of sex and nudity because I know that’s your thing too.

The witcher

Where to see: Netflix

The witcher

If the complex political drama of the Vikings fascinates you, you will get a face of it in Netflix’s The Witcher. However, it is much more based on fantasy and in a spectacular way brings to the screen the novels of the Polish author Andrzej Sapkowski about a monster hunter who fulfills an unknown fate. At the same time, an expansive battle for a continent is being waged between a brutal empire and several independent nation-states. Plus, Henry Cavill is the only other charismatic, sword-wielding guy who can hold a candle to Travis Fimmel.

Vikings is available now on Hulu and Amazon (part season).

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